Wednesday 25th Apr 2018
6:30 – 8:30pm
at UW Seattle Campus
Architecture Hall, Room 147
Put on by UW Landscape Architecture Department
More info / registration

With the onslaught of challenges (and opportunities) associated with climate change, significant demographic shifts and increased political activism, what is the role of the landscape architect in designing for such change? Gina Ford will discuss a series of projects at a variety for scales where landscape is a medium and catalyst for addressing resilience, equity and democratic action.

This lecture is FREE and open to the public, but attendees are asked to register.

Attendees will be offered 1 PDH (Professional Development Hour) via LA/CES.

Gina Ford, FASLA, is a landscape architect, co-founder and principal of Agency Landscape + Planning. Underpinning her two decades of practice are a commitment to the design and planning of public places and the perpetuation of the value of landscape architecture via thought leadership, exhibitions, teaching, writing and lecturing.

Gina’s work encompasses a wide range of scales and project types, from public parks and plazas to large-scale landscape planning and waterfront projects. She brings to each project a passion for the process of making vibrant landscape spaces—from the conceptual design to the details of implementation—with a particular focus on the life and use of urban, public environments. Gina led the design of the Chicago Riverwalk, Boston’s Lawn on D, Council Bluff’s Tom Hanafan Rivers Edge Park and Raleigh’s Moore Square and strategic planning efforts including the Cedar Rapids Flood Recovery Planning, the Rebuild by Design Competition and the Changing Course Competition while a principal with Sasaki.

Her work has received awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects, the American Planning Association and the American Institute of Architects, among others. She is on the board of directors for the Cultural Landscape Foundation and was the recipient of the Harvard Graduate School of Design’s Charles Eliot Travelling Fellowship and Wellesley College’s Shaw Fellowship.

-via UW Landscape Architecture Department