Wednesday 16th Jan 2019
6:30 – 7:30pm
at UW Architecture Hall, Room 147
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Put on by UW College of Built Environments
More info / registration (free)

Lance Freeman is a Professor in the Urban Planning program at Columbia GSAPP. His research focuses on affordable housing, gentrification, ethnic and racial stratification in housing markets, and the relationship between the built environment and well being. Professor Freeman teaches courses on community development, housing policy and research methods.

His newest book, A Haven and a Hell, researches issues related to neighborhood change, urban poverty, housing policy, urban sprawl and residential segregation. The black ghetto is thought of as a place of urban decay and social disarray and perceived as a space of confinement, one imposed on black America by whites. It is the home of a marginalized underclass and a sign of the depth of American segregation. Yet while black urban neighborhoods have suffered from institutional racism and economic neglect, they have also been places of refuge and community.

Lance Freeman examines how the ghetto shaped black America and black America shaped the ghetto. Freeman will trace the evolving role of predominantly black neighborhoods in northern cities from the late nineteenth century through the present day. At times, the ghetto promised the freedom to build black social institutions and political power. At others, it suppressed and further stigmatized African Americans. Freeman will explore the forces that caused the ghetto’s role as haven or hell to wax and wane, spanning the Great Migration, mid-century opportunities, the eruptions of the sixties, the challenges of the seventies and eighties, and present-day issues of mass incarceration, the subprime crisis, and gentrification.

This event is free and open to the public. Please register.

-via UW College of Built Environments